Category: LIDS LIVE

This week: LIDS Fall Symposium, 10/31

Posted on October 27th, by hlids in Events, LIDS LIVE. No Comments

This week, LIDS is excited to present our annual Fall Symposium, focused on Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Rebuilding from Emergency to Development!

Date: Friday, October 31, 2014
Time: 12:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Location: Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East BC
Evening Reception at 4:30 pm at the Hark South Dining Room

Read more here.

On Friday, October 31st, experts, practitioners, and academics working on issues of development and reconstruction in post-conflict countries will convene at Harvard Law School to discuss strategies to best promote growth, stability, and long-term development in countries arising from violent conflict. In light of recent conflicts in countries such as Syria and Iraq, and keeping in mind the long – and in many cases, still ongoing – efforts to rebuild and develop in countries such as Afghanistan, Rwanda, and Cambodia, it is a particularly critical inquiry. Countries arising from conflict have often had basic infrastructure and institutions destroyed, poor prospects for economic growth, and face lack of security and rule of law.  The Symposium’s speakers will highlight barriers that countries from Rwanda to Afghanistan have faced in the process of transition, as well as the best practices employed in moving forward — including in promoting economic growth and development, institutionalizing the rule of law, and implementing justice and security sector reform.

Our Keynote … Read More »


Welcome New Students!

Posted on September 16th, by Sarah Weiner & Beth Nehrling in LIDS LIVE. No Comments

First of all, congratulations and welcome! We are the Harvard Law and International Development Society—a diverse mix of students from Harvard Law School, the Kennedy School of Government, the Tufts Fletcher School, and other graduate schools in Boston who share a passion for the challenges and opportunities that lie at the intersection of law, policy and international development. We are firmly committed to two goals: making a difference in international development and providing our members with opportunities to get involved in hands-on, exciting and high-impact work in a field of their choice. Whether you have experience in international development or are interested in learning more about it, we would like to invite you to learn more about the work we do and meet some of our members. We look forward to getting to know you all this fall!

There are three main ways to get involved with LIDS as a new student at one of our member schools:

1)     Work on a LIDS-Orrick project. Join a group of 5-10 graduate students and work directly with a senior client at one of our partners—generally, a development-focused NGO, IGO, or an entrepreneur serving the bottom of the pyramid. LIDS projects are excellent opportunities to … Read More »

Whose Custom, Whose Law, Whose Land?

Posted on September 11th, by Marian Grove in LIDS LIVE. No Comments

Colonial and apartheid policies in South Africa have had lasting – and complex – impact on indigenous customary law, and with it, on indigent people’s access to land.

“Customary law” is a general term referring to the indigenous or local customs and traditions (i.e. laws) of peoples that live communally. Under colonial rule in South Africa, customary law was given a third class status beneath western-imported British common law and Roman-Dutch civil law. Colonial rulers superficially recognized native customs, but simultaneously supplanted them with western legal concepts such as the ownership of property by a single homestead through a deed or other written entitlement. As a general rule, the colonial government acknowledged indigenous leadership structures only to the extent that it benefitted its system of indirect rule. Hence, the government drew (often with little cultural understanding) firm ethnic and geographic boundaries around tribes, instating chiefs they knew to be subservient to colonial control, and declaring that tribe members could obtain land or other resources only through these tribes and chiefs. Apartheid deepened these distortions of traditional leadership and custom, locking native people within the physical and cultural bounds of tribes and chiefs whose power had been enhanced by colonial impact.

Following the … Read More »