Category: Uncategorized

Announcing the 2014-2015 LIDS Co-Presidents!

Posted on April 9th, by Becky Wolozin & Raj Banerjee in Uncategorized. No Comments

We are pleased to announce Sarah Weiner (HLS ’15) and Beth Nehrling (HLS ’15) as the incoming Co-Presidents of the Harvard International Law and Development Society for the academic year 2014-2015. Sarah and Beth are inspiring in their commitment to international development and their strong vision for LIDS going forward. Read about their vision for LIDS in the coming year below. We hope you will join us in congratulating Sarah and Beth!

Beth & Sarah’s Co-President Vision Statement: Institutionalizing LIDS

LIDS had a momentous 2013-2014 school year! Becky and Raj delivered on their promise to raise LIDS’s profile through our online presence, collaboration with our member schools, and events at HLS, such as the International Women’s Day Exhibition. LIDS embarked on an exciting initiative to connect with students at law schools around the world that are interested in development. And the Projects Team received a record number of proposals from organizations wanting to have an Orrick-LIDS team complete a project for them. Our goal for 2014-2015 is to build on that success and ensure that LIDS becomes institutionalized—both online as a space to debate law and development issues and at HLS and LIDS partner schools as a firmly established student organization.

To this … Read More »


US Moves to Freeze and Seize Nigerian Dictator Abacha’s Assets–But Who Will Get the Money?

Posted on March 10th, by Rajarshi Banerjee in Uncategorized. No Comments

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This post was originally published in the Global Anticorruption Blog, an exciting new initiative by Harvard Law School professor, and LIDS mentor, Matthew Stephenson. Six current and former LIDS members–Rajarshi Banerjee, Daniel Holman, Maryum Jordan, Meng Lu, Philip Underwood, and Colette van der Ven–are contributors to the Blog. LIDS Live will post brief introductions to their posts, and direct you to the Blog to read the rest.

By Rajarshi Banerjee

Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it had frozen about $458 million in corruption proceeds that former Nigerian dictator Sani Abacha and his conspirators allegedly embezzled from Nigeria’s central bank, laundered through U.S. financial institutions, and deposited in bank accounts around the world. The freeze is a first step in the DOJ’s largest-ever forfeiture action under its recent Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative (KARI).  There is much to say about this development, but the question that most immediately comes to my mind (and likely many Nigerians’ minds) is: What will the DOJ do with all this money? Continue reading on the Global Anticorruption Blog →


World Justice Challenge: Seed Grant Competition to Strengthen the Rule of Law

Posted on November 11th, by hlids in Uncategorized. No Comments

The World Justice Challenge, sponsored by the World Justice Project (WJP), is an open competition designed to inspire individuals to create initiatives that will strengthen the rule of law where they live and work. It provides an opportunity for individuals to test practical solutions on the ground supported by:

• Modest seed grants—the typical size of a seed grant is $15,000 to $25,000

• Connections to others in the WJP’s global network

• Increased visibility through media and communications support

The WJP believes that everyone is a stakeholder in the rule of law, and that a multidisciplinary approach is essential to creating long-lasting change.

How It Works

Stage 1: Identify an area for improvement. Using the WJP Rule of Law Index, individuals can identify areas where the rule of law needs improvement in the country in which they live or work.

Stage 2: Create an initiative to improve the rule of law. Individuals begin to create ideas to address the challenge. This process may be done with individuals from different sectors or countries in order to encourage diverse perspectives, or it may be created independently. A complete proposal is then submitted to the WJP for consideration for incubation support.

Stage 3: WJP selects initiatives to receive support. Once … Read More »