Tag: Corruption

Rethinking Kiobel: Is there room for human rights in anticorruption enforcement?

Posted on April 21st, by Maryum Jordan in LIDS LIVE. No Comments

April 21, 2014 – Maryum Jordan

This post was originally published in the Global Anticorruption Blog, an exciting new initiative by Harvard Law School professor, and LIDS mentor, Matthew Stephenson. Six current and former LIDS members–Rajarshi Banerjee, Daniel Holman, Maryum Jordan, Meng Lu, Philip Underwood, and Colette van der Ven–are contributors to the Blog. LIDS Live will post brief introductions to their posts, and direct you to the Blog to read the rest.

It is the one-year anniversary of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum Co. In its decision, the Court narrowed the admissibility of Alien Tort Statute (ATS) claims related to extraterritorial human rights abuses, ruling that such claims are not actionable unless the claim has a sufficient nexus to U.S. territory. What kind of nexus is enough for an ATS case arising from exterritorial conduct? For cases involving foreign multinational companies, such as the defendant Royal Dutch Petroleum in Kiobel, a “mere corporate presence” in the U.S. is not enough.

A striking feature of this holding is the clear contrast between how a “mere corporate presence” in the U.S. is not enough for an ATS claim based on extraterritorial conduct, but is sufficient for a Foreign Corrupt Practices … Read More »


LIDS Advisory Board Member to Teach HLS Course on Anti-Corruption

Posted on April 18th, by Daniel Holman in LIDS LIVE. No Comments

This fall, LIDS Advisory Board Member  El Cid Butuyan will be teaching a seminar on “Transnational Corruption” at Harvard Law School.  Mr. Butuyan’s work as a Senior Litigator for the Integrity Vice Presidency of the World Bank and background managing high level anti-corruption prosecutions in the Philippines allow him to draw upon a wealth of personal experience in teaching the course.  LIDS encourages members with an interest in the topics of anti-corruption regulation, enforcement, and policy issues to consider joining the course!  Non-HLS students may be eligible to cross-register according to applicable procedures.  The court catalog description follows.

Transnational Corruption – Fall 2014 Seminar

Mr. El Cid Butuyan | Th 3:00pm – 5:00pm | 2 classroom credits

“This course will explore the emergence of the global anti-corruption movement and will provide students with: a brief overview of the trends in the burgeoning field of anti-corruption enforcement including various global norms on the subject; the work of select regulatory and enforcement authorities and international and multilateral institutions; and the day-to-day lawyering skills required of practitioners. Through readings, lectures, case studies, class discussions, and potential guest speakers, the course aims to introduce students to significant substantive and practical issues in international anti-corruption work and the fundamentals required for … Read More »


US Moves to Freeze and Seize Nigerian Dictator Abacha’s Assets–But Who Will Get the Money?

Posted on March 10th, by Rajarshi Banerjee in Uncategorized. No Comments

This post was originally published in the Global Anticorruption Blog, an exciting new initiative by Harvard Law School professor, and LIDS mentor, Matthew Stephenson. Six current and former LIDS members–Rajarshi Banerjee, Daniel Holman, Maryum Jordan, Meng Lu, Philip Underwood, and Colette van der Ven–are contributors to the Blog. LIDS Live will post brief introductions to their posts, and direct you to the Blog to read the rest.

By Rajarshi Banerjee

Last week, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that it had frozen about $458 million in corruption proceeds that former Nigerian dictator Sani Abacha and his conspirators allegedly embezzled from Nigeria’s central bank, laundered through U.S. financial institutions, and deposited in bank accounts around the world. The freeze is a first step in the DOJ’s largest-ever forfeiture action under its recent Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Initiative (KARI).  There is much to say about this development, but the question that most immediately comes to my mind (and likely many Nigerians’ minds) is: What will the DOJ do with all this money? Continue reading on the Global Anticorruption Blog →